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IS AUTOEROTICISM (MASTURBATION) A SIN?  (Crucial Updates on Wednesday, September 16, 2009)

 

 

Copyright October 15, 2008 6:28 AM CST

By The Pneumiatry Institute & The L. F. Nexus

 

Updated January 6, 2011 2:28 AM CST

Copyright January 6, 2011 2:28 AM CST

By The Pneumiatry Institute & The L. F. Nexus

 

 

 

There are some things we are not permitted to share with anyone in a public forum.  These things a virtuous person will find on their own.

 

 

Before you read this article, read The “M” Word for some background information.

 

 

We are taking a more direct and explicit approach to the subject of autoeroticism because the need for clear information on this subject is so great.  The article The “M” Word will provide a part of the answer.  The article may suggest a question in the minds of many regarding the idea of “involuntary sin”; that is, how can an involuntary act, an act done by oneself against one’s will, be a sin?

 

Well, this is because there is a difference between sin and wrongdoing.  Sin, according to the Bible, is “falling short of God’s moral standard whether you intend to or not.”  Wrongdoing is “falling short of God’s moral standard on purpose.”  So, yes, sin can be involuntary.

 

There is a second question that arises in the minds of people regarding this matter of involuntary sin:

 

How do I know whether my action is involuntary?

 

Well, this is an interesting and tricky question to answer.  Let us analyze (take a closer look at) voluntary action.  Voluntary action requires a minimum of four components:

 

1.      Two things that can be chosen – options – for example, eating an apple or eating an orange.

 

2.      Two plans of choosing, one for each of the two options.

 

We represent this symbolically as:

 

P1 à O1 (eating the apple)

 

P2 à O2 (eating an orange)

 

“O1” is one option (eating the apple).

 

“O2 is a second option (eating the orange).

 

“P1” is the plan of choosing option O1.

 

“P2” is the plan of choosing option O2.

 

Now bear in mind that the “four component minimum” rule applies no matter what the options are, whether to stay home or go out, whether to go to college or join the Army, etc., etc.  We call this set of four (or more) components a “decision workshop” or “workshop” for short.  Now, to tell if any given action would be voluntary you need to check and see if you are conscious of a decision workshop.  If so, the action would be voluntary.  If not so…well, not so fast; this isn’t as simple as it sounds.  Why?  Well, let’s look at P1 and P2 more closely.  Before we go any further, note that, for some of you, this will be over your head.  However, keep reading because we explain things in a simpler way further into this article.

 

Do you choose to carry out P1 or P2?

 

In other words, do you choose to choose?

 

If so, you would have (the “V” symbol means “and”):

 

P1 à P1 V P2 à P1

 

P1 à P2 V P2 à P2

 

To put it another way:

 

P1 à O1 (which is P1)

 

P2 à O2 (which is P1)

 

P1 à O1 (which is P2)

 

P2 à O2 (which is P2)

 

You might say “Yes, I choose to choose sometimes.”  Okay, well what about:

 

P1 à (P1 à P1 V P2 à P1)

 

P2 à (P1 à P1 V P2 à P1)

 

P1 à (P1 à P2 V P2 à P2)

 

P2 à (P1 à P2 V P2 à P2)

 

P1 à (P1 à P1 V P2 à P1)

 

P2 à (P1 à P1 V P2 à P1)

 

P1 à (P1 à P2 V P2 à P2)

 

P2 à (P1 à P2 V P2 à P2)

 

Well, you might be asking  “What is that all about?”  Well, that’s a symbolic representation of “choosing to choose to choose.”

 

Now, we could go on and represent (this is a never-ending series):

 

·         Choosing to choose to choose to choose.

 

·         Choosing to choose to choose to choose to choose.

 

·         Choosing to choose to choose to choose to choose to choose.

 

·         Choosing to choose to choose to choose to choose to choose to choose.

 

·         Etc.

 

·         Etc.

 

·         Etc.

 

Well, do any of us do any of this?  No.  And, if you answered, “Yes, we do,” well, either way, since:

 

The series above is never-ending.

 

Therefore:

 

Every act of choosing involves an act that does NOT involve the four components (or more) of any decision workshop.

 

In plain English, at some point:

 

We do NOT choose to choose.

 

To put it another way, our actions are involuntary.

 

Now, LOGICALLY, this means:

 

We are not responsible for any of our actions.

 

HOWEVER, there’s a problem:

 

The Bible, our minds, our consciences, all of the religions of the world, society, psychology (see superego [link not yet active]), and psychiatry (see superego [link not yet active]) tell us we are responsible for our actions.

 

Now:

 

There is no scientific basis – nothing you examine with your eyes and feel with your hands – that proves that the Bible and our minds and our consciences and the religions of the world and society and psychology and psychiatry our wrong when they tell us that we are responsible for our actions.

 

Therefore:

We cannot reject the truth of personal responsibility on any scientific grounds.

 

The fact is:

 

There is no basis whatsoever for rejecting personal responsibility.

 

Now:

 

There is no responsibility unless action is voluntary.

 

Therefore:

 

Our actions are voluntary.

 

Okay, so where does this leave us?

 

We are confronted with a paradox – two contradictory truths:

 

1.     Our actions are involuntary.

 

2.     Our actions are voluntary.

 

What are we to do?

 

The answer lies in the fact that, although we know that we are dealing with a paradox (two truths that contradict each other), none of us believes both truths at the same time.

We either believe one of the truths or we believe neither of the truths.

(A quick side note:  If a person could believe both truths at the same time, they would, in effect, either believe one of the truths or believe neither of the truths.  In other words, the outcome would be the same.)

 

Therefore:

 

(1) If, in one case, a person believes their action is voluntary, they have responsibility.

(2) If, in another case, they believe their action is involuntary, they have no responsibility.

(3) In all other situations, they can only inconclusively think of how to respond to the paradox or believe (1) or (2).

 

It is crucial to note that one is never justified in accepting the idea that action is involuntary.  Read on.

 

Now, getting back to the main subject of this article, this means:

 

(1) If, in one case, a person believes their autoeroticism is voluntary, they have responsibility and they are guilty of wrongdoing.

(2) If, in another case, they believe their autoeroticism is involuntary, they have no responsibility and they are NOT guilty of wrongdoing.

(3) In all other situations, they can only inconclusively think of how to respond to the paradox or believe (1) or (2).

 

It is crucial to note that one is never justified in accepting the idea that autoeroticism is involuntary.  Read on.

 

 

Note that the above discussion does not include the concept of “project potentiality,” which is symbolically represented as:

 

P1 à O1 (eating the apple)

 

P2 à O1 (not eating the apple)

 

In this case, while actions P1 and P2 are voluntary, there are no options, though the symbolic representation (“O1” appearing twice) makes it appear that there are.  There is only a potential “project.”  In “volitional psychology” (our term and behavioral science field innovation) and “volitional psychiatry” (our term and behavioral science field innovation), a project is “something to which one commits themself.”  If we had included project potentiality in our discussion above, we would have nullified the paradoxical element that “our actions are involuntary” and we, therefore, could not have arrived at the fact of paradox.  Now, you might object that we have not taken into consideration all of the facts in doing so and, technically, you would be correct but this was necessary in order to accommodate a specific belief system – one in which there is no voluntary action without options; that is, there is no voluntary action with only a single course of action before the person.

 

In addition, our discussion may lead to the concept of “project potentiality” for anyone who continues to think about what they have read.  Suffice it to say that there are:

 

·         Voluntary action with options.

 

·         Voluntary action without options; that is, voluntary action with only a single course of action before the person.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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