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The Life Foundations Nexus

PROPER NUTRITION

 

 

Proper Nutrition (rated 10)

 

·        (rated 10) Nutritional changes should be made at a moderate pace.  As you improve your nutrition you will begin to like some foods more and other foods less.

·        (rated 10) Become your own nutritionist.  In other words, make the study of nutrition a lifelong pursuit.  There is a lot you can learn about nutrition and there is always more you can learn about nutrition.

·        (rated 10) Use the following grocery list:

o       Buy much more of these:

§         6 or more servings per day of grain products (rated 9):

·        Whole grain breads  (rated 9)

·        Whole grain cereals (rated 9)

·        Whole grain pasta (rated 9)

§         5 or more servings a day of fruits and vegetables (rated 10):

·        Vegetables (rated 10) (Eat 3 to 4 cups of vegetables per day.  (rated 9)

o       Beans and legumes (Eat 3 to 5 cups of beans and legumes per week (e.g., black, kidney, pinto, garbanzo, lentils, split peas).  [rated 9].)

·        Fruits (rated 10) (Eat 3 to 5 servings of fruit per day.  [rated 9].)

§         Vegetable oils (rated 10)

§         Margarine (Do not buy stick margarine.  Buy soft (possibly liquid) margarine (comes in a tub or bottle).  The first ingredient on the nutrition label must be called “liquid vegetable oil” or “canola oil” or “corn oil” or one of the unsaturated fats oils listed below.) (rated 10)

o       Buy much less of these:

§         No more than 2 servings per day of nonfat dairy products. (The quantity and frequency referred to here are rated 10.)

§         No more than 6 ounces (after cooking) no more than every other day from the meat group (the quantity and frequency referred to here are rated 10):

·        Seafood (rated 2) (Eat no more than 2 seafood meals a week.  The frequency referred to here is rated 10.  See the “Nonplant foods include” section below under the “Seafood” subsection for types of seafood to eat.)

·        Skinless Poultry (rated 2) (The breast is healthiest.  [rated 10])

·        Lean meat (rated 2)  (Pick lean sirloin and lean round steak.  [rated 10])

o       Buy even less of these:

§         Everything else (rated 1)

·        (rated 8) Rule of Sixes (This is an approximation of what you should eat daily.  See grocery list above for more accurate information.)

o       6 servings per day of grain products

o       6 servings per day of fruits and vegetables

o       6 ounces every other day from the meat group

·        (rated 10) Eat a variety of foods.  This assures that you get all of the “building blocks of life,” which are:

o       water

o       carbohydrates

o       proteins

o       fats

o       vitamins

o       minerals

·        (rated 9) Eat every food in moderation.

·        (rated 10) Eat enough calories to maintain a healthy weight.  See “Weight Maintenance” section on the previous page.

 

·        (rated 10) Eat foods low in fat.  Fat is more than twice as fattening as other foods.  Remember that your body needs fat.

 

·        (rated 10) The following table provides the “fat-Q index” for the most fattening foods.  The fat-Q index (from “fat index without total regard for quantity [amount] of food”) tells you how much fat there is in a food compared to other foods but without total regard for the amount of each food.  “1” indicates least amount of fat.  “1000” indicates most amount of fat.  The item in the table with the least amount of fat - HOLLANDAISE SCE, W/ H2O, FRM MX - provides 1/3 of the fat that a person needs who is on a 2000-calories-per-day diet.

 

Description of Food

Amount

Fat-Q Index

Description of Food

Amount

Fat-Q Index

HOLLANDAISE SCE, W/ H2O, FRM MX

1 CUP

92

LIGHT, COFFEE OR TABLE CREAM

1 CUP

211

PORK FRESH RIB, ROASTD, LEAN + FAT

3 OZ

92

QUICHE LORRAINE

1 SLICE

220

CARROT CAKE, CREMCHESE FRST, REC

1 PIECE

96

SOUR CREAM

1 CUP

220

HAMBURGER, 4 OZ PATTY

1 SANDWH

96

MARGARINE, SPREAD, SOFT, 60% FAT

3 OZ

237

POTATO SALAD MADE W/ MAYONNAIS

1 CUP

96

SEMISWEET CHOCOLATE

1 CUP

280

MACARONI AND CHEESE, HOME RCPE

1 CUP

101

CASHEW NUTS, DRY ROASTD, UNSALT

1 CUP

289

PORK SHOULDER, BRAISD, LEAN + FAT

3 OZ

101

CASHEW NUTS, DRY ROASTED, SALTD

1 CUP

289

CREME PIE

1 PIECE

105

CASHEW NUTS, OIL ROASTD, SALTED

1 CUP

289

FISH SANDWICH, REG, W/ CHEESE

1 SANDWH

105

CASHEW NUTS, OIL ROASTD, UNSALT

1 CUP

289

ICE CREAM, VANLLA, SOFT SERVE

1 CUP

105

MARGARINE, REGULR, SOFT, 80% FAT

3 OZ

315

ICE CREAM, VANLLA, RICH 16% FT

1 CUP

110

ALMONDS, SLIVERED

1 CUP

320

BEEF ROAST, RIB, LEAN + FAT

3 OZ

119

PEANUTS, OIL ROASTED, SALTED

1 CUP

325

BEEF, CKD, CHUCK BLADE, LEAN + FAT

3 OZ

119

PEANUTS, OIL ROASTED, UNSALTED

1 CUP

325

BREAD STUFFING, FROM MX, MOIST

1 CUP

119

WALNUTS, BLACK, CHOPPED

1 CUP

325

LAMB, RIB, ROASTED, LEAN + FAT

3 OZ

119

FILBERTS, (HAZELNUTS) CHOPPED

1 CUP

331

PORK CHOP, LOIN, PANFRY, LEAN + FAT

3 OZ

119

PECANS, HALVES

1 CUP

335

AVOCADOS, FLORIDA

1 AVOCDO

123

WALNUTS, ENGLISH, PIECES

1 CUP

340

COCONUT, RAW, SHREDDED

1 CUP

123

WHIPPING CREAM, UNWHIPED, LIGHT

1 CUP

340

FISH SANDWICH, LGE, W/O CHEESE

1 SANDWH

123

WHIPPING CREAM, UNWHIPED, HEAVY

1 CUP

403

SWEETENED CONDENSED MILK CNND

1 CUP

123

MACADAMIA NUTS, OILRSTD, SALTED

1 CUP

472

HALF AND HALF, CREAM

1 CUP

128

MACADAMIA NUTS, OILRSTD, UNSALT

1 CUP

472

AVOCADOS, CALIFORNIA

1 AVOCDO

137

MARGARINE, SPREAD, HARD, 60% FAT

1 CUP

632

BEEF POTPIE, HOME RECIPE

1 PIECE

137

MARGARINE, REGULR, HARD, 80% FAT

1 CUP

834

PARMESAN CHEESE, GRATED

1 CUP

137

BUTTER, SALTED

1 CUP

842

WHITE SAUCE, MEDIUM, HOME RECP

1 CUP

137

BUTTER, UNSALTED

1 CUP

842

BREAD STUFFING, FROM MX, DRYTYPE

1 CUP

143

FATS, COOKING/VEGETBL SHORTENG

1 CUP

940

CHEESEBURGER, 4 OZ PATTY

1 SANDWH

143

LARD

1 CUP

940

CHICKEN POTPIE, HOME RECIPE

1 PIECE

143

OLIVE OIL

1 CUP

991

PECAN PIE

1 PIECE

147

PEANUT OIL

1 CUP

991

RICOTTA CHEESE, WHOLE MILK

1 CUP

147

CORN OIL

1 CUP

1000

MARGARINE, IMITATION 40% FAT

3 OZ

151

SAFFLOWER OIL

1 CUP

1000

COCONUT, DRIED, SWEETND, SHREDD

1 CUP

152

SOYBEAN OIL, HYDROGENATED

1 CUP

1000

CHICKEN A LA KING, HOME RECIPE

1 CUP

156

SOYBEAN-COTTONSEED OIL, HYDRGN

1 CUP

1000

CHEDDDAR CHEESE, SHREDDED

1 CUP

170

SUNFLOWER OIL

1 CUP

1000

IMITATN SOUR DRESSING

1 CUP

179

 

 

 

 

·        (rated 10) Eat much more plant foods than nonplant foods.

 

·        (rated 10) Nonplant foods include:

o       Beef

o       Lamb

o       Pork (Pork tenderloin is a leaner cut.)

o       Veal

o       Poultry

o       Seafood

§         The following are safer seafoods to eat:

·        Salmon

·        Flounder

·        Cod

·        Catfish

·        Trout

·        Pollock

·        Clams

·        Shrimp (high in cholesterol so have only a little)

·        Scallops

·        Lobster

o       Eggs

o       Dairy products

·        (rated 10) Eat almost no red meat.

·        (rated 10) Follow this ORDER OF PRIORITY in choosing foods containing trans fats (trans fatty acids), saturated fats, cholesterol, and polyunsaturated fats:

o       First, choose foods extremely low in trans fats (trans fatty acids).  The words “partially hydrogenated” and “hydrogenated” indicate trans fats. (rated 10)

o       Then, second, choose foods low in saturated fats.

o       Then, third, choose foods low in cholesterol.

o       Then, fourth choose foods low in polyunsaturated fats.

·        (rated 10) Consume foods that are extremely low in trans fats (trans fatty acids).  This is more important than consuming foods low in saturated fats.  The words “partially hydrogenated” and “hydrogenated” indicate trans fats.  Trans fats are found in many processed foods.

o       One food that contains trans fats is:

§         Stick margarine (high in trans fats)

o       Some foods that usually contain trans fats are:

§         French fries

§         Donuts

§         Cookies

§         Cakes

§         Crackers

·        (rated 9) Consume foods low in saturated fats.  This is more important than consuming foods low in cholesterol.  Saturated fats are found in:

o       Meat

o       Butter

o       Whole milk

o       Cream

o       Cheese

o       Ice cream

o       Coconut oil

o       Cocoa butter

o       Palm kernel oil

o       Palm oils

·        (rated 9) Unsaturated fats are found in these trans-fat-free oils:

o       Safflower oil

o       Corn oil

o       Soybean oil

o       Olive oil

o       Canola oil

·        (rated 9) Consume foods low in cholesterol.  Cholesterol is found in:

o       Eggs (High cholesterol food.  Egg whites have no fat and no cholesterol.)

o       Meat (Moderate cholesterol food.)

o       Poultry (Moderate cholesterol food.)

o       Fish (Moderate cholesterol food.)

o       Dairy products (Moderate cholesterol food if medium to high fat content.  Low cholesterol food if low fat content.  Very low cholesterol food if skim milk product.)

·        (rated 10) The following table provides the “cholesterol index” for common foods.  “1” indicates least amount of cholesterol.  “1000” indicates most amount of cholesterol.  The amount of each food is the same in terms of weight.

 

Food

Cholesterol Index

Food

Cholesterol Index

Eggs, white

0

Haddock, baked

46

Non-dairy creamer, dry

0

Cheese, neufchatel

47

Non-dairy whipped topping

0

Beef, prime rib, lean only

51

Milk, skim

1

Pork, loin, lean only

51

Yogurt, part skim

4

Catfish, breaded, fried

51

Milk, 2%

4

Beef, ground, extra lean

52

Cheese, dry curd

4

Pork, loin, lean and fat

52

Ice milk

4

Bacon

53

Sherbet

4

Chicken, roasted, no skin

53

Yogurt, whole

8

Turkey, dark meat

53

Milk, whole

9

Beef, prime rib, lean and fat

54

Cheese, cottage, creamed

9

Salmon, baked

54

Tuna, oil packed, drained

19

Duck

56

Tuna, water packed, drained

26

Beef, ground, regular

56

Ice cream, regular

27

Cheese, swiss

58

Cheese, mozzarella, part skim

34

Cheese, cheddar

67

Cod, baked

34

Cheese, cream

69

Ham, regular

37

Lamb, lean only

76

Bologna

37

Lamb, lean and fat

76

Crab

37

Veal cutlet

80

Ice cream, premium

37

Cream

86

Bratwurst

37

Chicken, fried with skin

104

Cheese, pasteurized processed cheese food

40

Shrimp, breaded, fried

110

Clams

42

Shrimp, boiled

122

Turkey, light meat

43

Eggs, whole (2 eggs)

342

Lobster, boiled

45

Eggs, yolk (6 yolks or 1/3 cup)

1000

 

·         (rated 10) Eat very little organ meats (high cholesterol foods).  Eat no liver or kidney.

o       Liver (Eat none.  Highly toxic.)

o       Brains

o       Chitterlings

o       Kidney (Eat none.  Toxic.)

o       Heart

o       Gizzard

o       Sweetbreads

·        (rated 10) Cholesterol is not found in plant foods and plant food products such as:

o       Fruits (contains fibre)

o       Vegetables (contains fibre)

o       Fruit juices (might contain fibre)

o       Grains (contains fibre)

o       Nuts (contains fibre)

o       Seeds (contains fibre)

·        (rated 10) Eat fresh fruits and vegetables.  The vitamins in fruits and vegetables lose their potency over time.

 

·        (rated 10) Eat plenty of fibre-containing foods.  If you don’t, you must take a fibre supplement, which is concentrated fibre.  Fibre is found in plant foods.  Fibre is cellulose (the chief part of the cell walls of plants).  Fibre (cellulose) is not digested.  Fibre protects the digestive system.  As you increase fibre intake, increase fluid intake.  Finally, include fibre-containing food or a fibre supplement with every meal (this statement rated 9).

 

The following table provides the “fibre index” for common foods.  “1” indicates least amount of fibre.  “100” indicates most amount of fibre.

 

Food

Amount

Fibre Index

Brown rice, barley

½ cup

20

Green beans (cooked), carrots, tomatoes, broccoli.

½ cup

20

Fruit

½ cup or one medium fresh fruit serving

20

Nuts and seeds

One half ounce

20

Whole grain or whole wheat breads and crackers

1 serving / 1 slice / 1 ounce

20

Low-fibre cereals:  Cheerios, Oatmeal, Wheaties

½ - 3/4 cup

25

Corn, peas

½ cup

30

Raw vegetables

1 - 2 cups

30

Dried peas, beans (black, red, kidney, pinto), lentils

1/3 cup

45

Moderate-fibre cereals:  Bran Flakes, Shredded Wheat, oat bran

1/2 - 3/4 cup

45

High-fibre cereals:  Fibre One, All-Bran, 100% Bran, Bran Buds

1/3 - 1/2 cup

100

 

·        (rated 10) Eat only organically grown foods.  Organically grown plant foods are grown using only natural fertilizers and no pesticides.  The use of natural fertilizers results in more nutritious foods.  Note that some foods labeled as “organic” are not.

·        (rated 10) Consume little sugar and sugar-rich foods like pop and candy and eat more foods that contain carbohydrates that the body converts slowly to sugar such as:

o       Pumpernickel

o       Oat bran bread

o       Oatmeal

o       All-Bran™

o       Parboiled rice

o       Sweet potato

o       Pasta (cooked “al dente” (firm) rather than overcooked is better)

o       Lentils/kidney/baked beans

o       Apple/banana/plum

o       Skim milk

o       Popcorn

·        (rated 10) The following table provides the “sugar conversion index” for common foods.  “1” indicates slowest conversion by the body of the carbohydrates in a food to sugar.  “100” indicates fastest conversion by the body of the carbohydrates in a food to sugar.  The slower the body converts the carbohydrates in a food to sugar the better.  Note that there are different types of sugars.  The kind of sugar referred to here is glucose, not sucrose, which is table sugar.

 

Food

Sugar Conversion Index

Skim milk

37

Sweet potato

44

Apple/banana/plum

44 (average)

Lentils/kidney/baked beans

44 (average)

Pasta

44 (average)

All-Bran™

48

Pumpernickel

53

Parboiled rice

55

Oat bran bread

58

Popcorn

64

Table sugar (sucrose)

67

Ice cream

70

Oatmeal

70

Couscous

75

Melba toast

81

White bread

81

Potato (boiled/mashed)

84

Soda crackers

85

French fries

86

Jellybeans

92

Rice Krispies™

94

Corn Flakes™

96

Instant rice

100

 

·        (rated 10) Keep your sodium intake low.  Salt is one source of sodium.  Reducing the amount of salt you use is one way to reduce sodium intake.

 

·        (rated 10) Consume caffeine in moderation.  Two cups of coffee a day or two cans of cola a day or one of each.

·        (rated 8) Take “vitamins” but note the rating for this item - 8.  Use an all-natural, multivitamin/multimineral supplement.  Keep the bottle tightly sealed and stored in a dark, dry, cool area to lengthen shelf life.

·        (rated 10) Eat fresh foods.  Avoid leftovers as much as possible.

 

(rated 10) Do not use aspartame (marketed as NutraSweet and Equal and added to a variety of processed foods and beverages).  Read food labels to see if foods contain aspartame.  See the “Food Substitutes” section on the previous page (aspartame fails both tests).

·        (rated 10) The following table provides the “meat safety index” for various meats.  “1” indicates safest meat.  “1000” indicates least safe meat.  Safety is based on amount of fat in each type of meat.

 

Type of Meat
(Quantities are 3½ ounces, unless otherwise noted.)

Meat Safety Index

Turkey, light meat

14

Chicken boneless, skinless breast—½ breast

19

Venison

28

Turkey, dark meat

43

Veal tenderloin

47

Extra lean ham

54

Beef, sirloin steak

71

Lean ground chuck

87

Canadian bacon

122

Pork chop

123

Lamb—leg

163

Duck, skinless

174

Salami—1 ounce

174

Chicken leg, skin on—one

209

Turkey sausage—two

278

Pork bologna

348

Pork sausage links—two large

348

Beef, ground

470

Pork chitterlings

504

Pepperoni

887

Bacon

1000

 

·        (rated 10) Here are the recommendations for how long you should keep various foods in the refrigerator or the freezer before you throw them out.  These recommendations come from the Food Safety and Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture.

 

Product

Refrigerator (40 °F)

Freezer (0 °F)

Eggs

Fresh, in shell

3 to 5 weeks

Don't freeze

Hardcooked

1 week

Don't freeze well

TV Dinners
Keep frozen until ready to use

 

3-4 months

Deli prepared convenience foods such as egg, chicken, ham, and macaroni salads

3-5 days

Don't freeze well

Hot dogs and Lunch Meats

Hot dogs, opened package

1 week

1-2 months

Hot dogs, unopened package

2 weeks

1-2 months

Lunch meats, opened

3-5 days

1-2 months

Lunch meats, unopened

2 weeks

1-2 months

Deli sliced luncheon meats

3-5 days

Don't freeze well

Soups and Stews
Vegetable or meat added

3-4 days

2-3 months

Ground Meat and Poultry

1-2 days

3-4 months

Bacon

7 days

1 month

Sausage

1-2 days

1-2 months

Ham

Ham, fully cooked--whole

7 days

1-2 months

Ham, fully cooked--half

3-5 days

1-2 months

Ham, fully cooked--slices

3-4 days

1-2 months

Fresh Meat

Beef, steaks and roasts

3-5 days

6-12 months

Pork, chops and roasts

3-5 days

4-6 months

Lamb, chops and roasts

3-5 days

6-9 months

Veal

3-5 days

4-8 months

Meat Leftovers

3-4 days

2-3 months

Fresh Poultry

Chicken or turkey, whole

1-2 days

1 year

Chicken or turkey pieces

1-2 days

9 months

Poultry Leftovers

3-4 days

4 months